Pierre Colin

Pierre Colin, The Trees, #9
Pierre Colin, The Trees, #9

Mixed media, print ink, black chalk, dry pastel, gold leaf, on paper 56 * 76 cm

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Pierre Colin, The Trees, #4
Pierre Colin, The Trees, #4

Mixed media, print ink, black chalk, dry pastel, acrylic on paper, 56 * 76 cm

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Pierre Colin, Tryptique jacinthe
Pierre Colin, Tryptique jacinthe

Pierre noire sur papier Rives blanc, 3 dessins de 56 * 76 cm

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Pierre Colin, The Trees, #9
Pierre Colin, The Trees, #9

Mixed media, print ink, black chalk, dry pastel, gold leaf, on paper 56 * 76 cm

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Graduated from the National School of Decorative Arts in Paris, Pierre Colin enhanced his work with different artistic and plastic approaches.

The combination of dry pastel, acrylic, black stone, and different collages, such as gold or silver leaf, sand, Chinese paper or old paper, offers us places, and spaces where skies, earth, mountains, mingle, and respond to each other, contradict each other, creating movements and questions. This results in colors that emerge from our planet to better confront or even blend with the lights falling from the heavens. The volumes seem to move and come out of a single matrix node.

Looking at Pierre Colin's paintings leads us to project ourselves into an infinite elsewhere. It brings together the emotions and senses that go hand in hand with a form of personal research. A questioning work inducing an inevitable movement. Text by C.  Sportis.

Collection : "The Trees" Pierre Colin draws maritime pines rising up to the sky, thin, thick, tight trunks, one against the other, sometimes few needles with the branches behind the clouds which protrude from the frame of the painting. Branches seem dead, they are not, rather it is the pine needles that are missing, and this is easily interpreted as a metaphor for absence. The stripped trunks can be seen as a memory of unity, sometimes with a push, or otherwise a hope, a sign of life that keeps coming back. The paintings recall notes taken in moments of childhood, rediscovering the smells of pines, of the resin that oozed along the trunks, and the salty air of the nearby sea. It is also to return to the source. "This tree is not a thing, but a being."